Dynasty League Football

Uncategorized

April Madness: How to Handle Your Rookie Draft

Vikes_Draft

The madness has come and gone. Every expert opinion was either proven correct or easily dismissed. There were cheers of exuberance as well as tears of sadness. For possibly the first time in their lives, these college athletes were given more attention than professionals—even if it was just for the moment.

Am I talking about the NFL draft that recently took place? Not at all.

I’m talking about March Madness.

March Madness (college basketball’s championship tournament) is one of the only times of the year when everybody and their Great Aunt Suzie is a verified sports critic. Everyone makes a bracket, they all think their picks are perfect, everyone believes their logic is sound and then, inevitably, nearly everyone is cut back down to size as their upset specials don’t pan out and their would-be champions are prematurely dethroned.

By the end of the tournament, most people have come to see that many of the picks that they once felt so sure of have turned out to be wrong. Just why is that?

In many cases, so many games are predicted incorrectly due to the fact that people get caught up in thinking that the “Cinderella stories” are going to happen with great frequency. Sure, it’s fun to root for the little guy, but when you pick half of the little guys on the bracket to upset perennial powerhouses, you will almost certainly lose all but one or two of those gambles.

Yes, I admit, if you swing for the fences enough with your picks, you will get glory and praise when Backwoods Southwest Appalachian Institute of Grass and Tree Bark upsets a school like Duke or Kansas, but you will also get a lot of mocking and ridicule thrown your way when all your other upset picks end up failing you. In reality, you are far better suited playing it safe and selecting your known contenders because, quite simply, they win more games. Minimize risk by picking favorites, and then trust your gut on only a limited few long shots.

Regardless of the picks made on your bracket, March Madness concluded, a champion was crowned and the sports world moved on to focus on the next big event: the 2013 NFL Draft. And, interestingly enough, a similar philosophy to filling out your tournament bracket can be applied to successfully navigating your dynasty league’s rookie draft.

First and second round picks are fun, exciting, flashy and can be franchise changing in dynasty leagues; however, unless you find yourself in complete rebuilding mode, you should not give up too much to attain them.

Drafting is an inexact science—one that even the experts and time-tested scouts haven’t quite mastered — so to assume any draft pick is a “sure thing” is very dangerous.

That being said, one can see it presents great risk to give up a substantial amount to go out and get a virtually unknown entity in a rookie. For example, if you were to package a deal around a player to go out and get an early round pick, you are going to have to give up a talented starter to make that happen. Dynasty team owners don’t give up premium draft picks for backup quarterbacks or 35-year-old running backs – it is going to take a skilled player. All of this begs the question of if you have to give up a talented player to get a chance at attaining a potentially talented player, why give up known entity?

The other common route for getting your hands on an early round draft pick is to create a package of lower draft picks to entice the holder of the premium pick. Similar problems arise with this strategy, however, in that owners aren’t going to give up a first-round pick for a series of very late round picks. Also, as mentioned previously, drafting is an inexact science, so if you can hold on to your first three picks as opposed to packaging many of them away in order to grab one first-round pick, then you are giving yourself more chances to get lucky and hit it big with one of your picks.

As we all know by now, success in fantasy football is all about minimizing risk. The rookie draft itself is not risky; however, it can be made risky if you get too adventurous by trying to attain exciting, early round draft picks unnecessarily.

As with anything else in the complex world of dynasty football leagues, however, there is a silver lining to this philosophy of risk minimization. If you are in a rebuilding stage and need that franchise player to build around for years to come, then by all means, do what it takes to get the first round pick necessary to attain the player you want (after all, if you’re rebuilding, what do you have to lose?). Another scenario in which you should throw caution to the wind and go all-in for a rookie is if you are absolutely in love with him as a player. At the end of the day, you are the owner. If your gut says ‘Go get this guy,’ or if he went to your Alma Mater and you can’t stand to see another owner snatch him up, or if you just know this is a can’t-miss prospect, go do what it takes to get him. You may never forgive yourself if you don’t.

Keep in mind that all too true statement I made earlier – drafting is an inexact science. Minimize your risk and don’t auction off key parts of your team if you don’t need to do so. Just remember, the 15 and 16 seeds are a combined 7-225 in the opening round of the NCAA basketball tournament. For every Andrew Luck and Robert Griffin III chosen in the rookie draft, there is a JaMarcus Russell or a Brady Quinn or a Ryan Leaf.

43 Comments
0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
43 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Paul Totten
9 years ago

I traded my 1.07 in a fourteen team dynasty league for M. Lynch. He took DeAndre Hopkins.

Ed Gordon
Reply to  Paul Totten
9 years ago

Wow, it must be nice to play in a league with your kid’s 6th grade classmates.

Paul Totten
Reply to  Ed Gordon
9 years ago

Lol. Trade almost got vetoed.

Obfuscius
Reply to  Paul Totten
9 years ago

Damn Totten, don’t air our league’s dirty laundry. I already told you that trade bummed me out — I thought I had killed that draft picking up Bernard, Bell, and Patterson with 1.02, 1.05, and 1.06, then this guy gets Lynch for the freaking 1.07.

E
Reply to  Paul Totten
9 years ago

I trade M. Lynch for 1.01 and 2.02 (14 team league so 2nd round pick is 16th overall) – i also have 1.03.

I’m taking Ball at 1.01. Bernard, Lacy or Bell at 1.03?

Paul Totten
Reply to  E
9 years ago

I like Bernard.

Ches
Reply to  E
9 years ago

I would go Bernard at 1.01 and Bell at 1.03

Dray
Reply to  Ches
9 years ago

E, I think your thinking right, I like M.Ball too. I care less about his amount of carries in college, he’s 21yrs old, he’s still fresh. Benard reminds me of a Willie Parker, Ball reminds me of a young F.Gore without the injuries! Plus his situations he’s fallen in is idea.

Rholio
Reply to  Dray
9 years ago

Bernard went 1.03 in my early dynasty draft, Ball went 1.08. I’d take Bernard first.

Chris Fryer
Reply to  E
9 years ago

I have 1.01 and 1.02 in a 1ppr league…I am taking Gio and Tavon.

E
Reply to  Chris Fryer
9 years ago

I’ve thought about Austin as well. We are PPR as well.

My other RBs are Mark Ingram, Bryce Brown and Ben Tate.

My WRs: Demaryius Thomas, Colston, Decker, James Jones, Randle, Jeffery

My needs at RB are greater which is why I’m looking Ball + another RB. I figure I can get another RB or WR with my 2nd round pick as well.

Montee Ball steps into an offense that can stretch the field and my hope is that will open up lanes for him to do damage.

michael bellace
Reply to  E
9 years ago

I love Bernard, then Ball, Lacy & Bell. I just landed Lynch in a trade myself. I’m so pumped about owning him and was desperate for a RB1 especially a top 5! This frees me up @ 1.03 to get WR or TE. I can’t wait for the late summer draft…wooohooo!

Matt
9 years ago

I’m a big fan of trading for known commodities.

I made 2 off season trades.

Moved my 1.02 and 2014 1st-I expect to be a playoff team- for David Wilson and a 2014 2nd

And

2.02, 3.02, 2014 3rd for Mark Ingram

I’d make both deals again today.

wood chipper
Reply to  Matt
9 years ago

Not sold on Ingram unless he moves teams.

Matt
Reply to  wood chipper
9 years ago

I see a lot of that talk. I’m on the other side of the fence. The Saints were a MESS last year with their coach. This year they will be winning in the 2nd half of games, Ingram will get most of the main RB touches.

I think he was injured his rookie year, had a knee scope in the off season and only got healthy the 2nd half of last year where he averaged about 4.7 and scored 4 tds. You double his second half and he’s at 800 and 8. I think 1,000 and 10 is well within reach.

Anyway if he was drafted by the Saints this year where would he go in the rookie draft? A lot higher than 2.2 that’s for sure.

sixshooter
Reply to  Matt
9 years ago

The Ingram trade was fine but I am not sold on the Wilson trade at all.

Wilson “might” be worth a first rounder but not necessarily a high first rounder at this point for sure and a second round pick is definitely not worth a first round pick! Giving up 2 first round picks for a second round pick and a player who has yet to prove himself is a bit of a stretch but I guess you have to take risks. This is just one risk where I would have opted for the first round picks versus the new guy and a second round pick.

Hopefully that 1.02 pick is not your original pick!

Matt
Reply to  sixshooter
9 years ago

I’m trying to follow what you are saying but I don’t quite get it. I owned Bradshaw and as soon as the off season was over I sent my 1.02 this year for David Wilson…and swapped my 2014 1st for a 2014 2nd.

The way I figured it was that Wilson could easily be the 1.01 in this years draft…and my squad scored the 3rd most points in the league last year…so I could swap say a 1.9 for a 2.4 or something like that. It didn’t seem like a big deal to me.

Where would you have Wilson ranked in this year’s class? He’s certainly my highest rated RB.

sixshooter
Reply to  Matt
9 years ago

I guess it isn’t as bad a deal as I first thought. I was just thinking you should be able to turn one of those two first round picks into a David Wilson with the hopes of maybe getting another potential player because there is a significant drop in talent after the top 10 rookies or so are gone.

But since you have a guy who has pretty much been handed the starting job to lose, I guess this trade isn’t as bad after further review.

I had made a trade last year that landed me the #1 overall this year and I ended up trading that pick back to the same owner in week 11 when it was a given the pick was going to be a top 2 pick (at the time). In return, I received Alfred Morris, Antonio Brown, Martellus Bennett and a second next year which was extreme but I wasn’t going to just hand another owner a pick that was potentially and ended up being the #1 overall.

Those top picks don’t come around very often (luckily) so it was very hard for me to let the pick go but he finally came over the top and I couldn’t accept the offer fast enough. More often than not, you have to overpay to get one of top 4 or 5 picks in our league which is why I don’t go after them very often.

When I did acquire this pick, it was not known where it would be and the other owner made the offer both times but I did not accept the first offer either time!

With that said, I do understand why you are happy with the trade and I do not feel that is was a bad trade by any means. I just felt that you may have been able to get a little more for 2 first round picks with one of them being the #2 overall. But every league is different with the way owners value draft picks, players, trades, etc.

Matt
Reply to  sixshooter
9 years ago

Appreciate the reply and input. I love that deal for you! Alf is what any of this running backs might turn out to be…and Antonio Brown could easily out equal Austin or whoever’s production for the next few years.

Jordan
9 years ago

Because of the unknown (are you getting Ryan Leaf or Peyton Manning), I have always been a supporter of trading away picks for known talent. Also, very few guys come out of the gate on fire (almost all WRs, Lesean McCoy, etc.) There is a great chance that top draft picks will be dropped or traded for less than they are worth if owners get impatient with them early on.

sixshooter
Reply to  Jordan
9 years ago

Great point especially with QB’s and most receivers. I remember thinking that Leaf would be better than Manning and Akili Smith would be better than Donovan McNabb & Daunte Culpepper and that Rick Mirer was better than Drew Bledsoe. You just don’t know with rookies…..not even those who are paid to know!

Matt
Reply to  sixshooter
9 years ago

Just wanted to follow up on our Wilson discussion. Part of the reason I made the deal was that I saw Wilson in the NFL. I saw him go for 5.0 yards per carry and scored 5 tds on 75 touches.

I haven’t seen a single snap from Bernard or Bell or Lacy.

I traded for a more known commodity in my mind…the pick swap aside.

sixshooter
Reply to  Matt
9 years ago

LOL….I replied above but I do get your philosophy and yes……Wilson did finish the season strong as the last four games is when he got his average up to 5 yds a carry, scored 4 of his five TD’s and was able to get his first 100 yd game in when he rushed 13 times for 100 yds and 2 TD’s. That one game accounted for pretty much a third of his stats for the season! The last four games were where he got going which is definitely a good sign. Unless he totally tanks in camp, he should be the starter for the Giants!

sixshooter
Reply to  sixshooter
9 years ago

BTW….Phildees comment below is just one more reason why I do not feel you made a bad trade! He is absolutely right…..this years NFL Draft really made fantasy rookie drafts a mess! So, if there was one year to unload a top pick…..it was this year!

John
9 years ago

“As we all know by now, success in fantasy football is all about minimizing risk.”

I disagree.

If you are always playing it safe, you are more than likely sorry in the standings.

sixshooter
Reply to  John
9 years ago

Not sure that was what was meant by the statement although I can see why you made the comment. I am thinking by “minimizing risk”, it was meant that you do not want to take an unnecessary risk rahter than saying that you “always play it safe” and NEVER take a risk. But I do agree….you need to take a risk or two or six to win a championship if you are in a competitive league!

Reply to  John
9 years ago

I totally disagree… I play a fairly conservative by the numbers FF game… In black Jack you can’t argue the numbers.. the same holds true for most of FF… There are odds and I nearly always play them. There are exceptions to the rule… For me that guy last year was Lamar Miller… Speed Kills! and with Reggies age and the messy rest of RBs there I made it a point to go out and get him. I probably reached about a half a round.. However, I expect it to pay off.. it’s all about risk/reward… In my opinion, swing for fence teams never win consistently. It’s all about consistency…

John
Reply to  Bill
9 years ago

Success in FF is not about minimizing risks. It is much to broad of a statement. Using it as a universal truth throws the entire piece into question. If you are taking risks, shouldn’t you be trying to MAXIMIZE them? If not, why are you taking risks in the first place? Makes no sense to me. If the author is speaking of calculated risks, then he missed the boat. He should have left out that statement altogether.

Cyrus Miller
Reply to  John
9 years ago

I think the issue might be the expression “minimizing risks.” That means you reduce the amount of risk, like hedging your bets or diversifying your stock portfolio.

You want to maximize the benefit of any risk you take, but overall, you want as little risk in your portfolio as possible. If you only invest in boom or bust stocks, your portfolio can collapse. If you invest in safer stocks that don’t have as much upside, you are minimizing risk and guaranteeing your portfolio remains strong.

sixshooter
Reply to  Cyrus Miller
9 years ago

LOL…..I must admit this is likely the first time I have heard of fantasy football being compared to stocks and blackjack.

I don’t buy the blackjack comparison because fantasy football is not even close to a black and white game as blackjack is and it’s not like you trade cards, etc in blackjack. You get the cards your dealt and the only decision made should be based on odds.

But with stocks you do have safe options and riskier options. You can trade one stock for another and you can simply cash out and get out of the game (ie. decline a trade offer and don’t counter) if you are not comfortable with your options.

If you see a stock that you have researched and believe is ready to take off, you may throw all your eggs in that basket hoping to get a high return down the road. This would be similar to having a gut feeling on a player and putting together a multiple player/pick deal that you hope will pay off which may involve giving up a veteran player with good but not great stats for an up and coming player with much higher potential.

Last year an owner gave up what turned out to be the 4th overall pick for an oft-injured Daren McFadden. That, to me, was taking a risk and one that I would not have taken but everyone values risks, picks and players differently!

Cyrus Miller
Reply to  John
9 years ago

I completely agree with playing it safe.

If you always swing for the fences, you might hit on a few picks/trades, but your overall team lacks depth.

If you play it safe, you have depth and your team can compete year in and year out, regardless of injuries.

Obviously you take calculated risks and might try to draft a player you love or trade for a prospect, but you don’t trade the farm for someone who hasn’t produced yet.

John
Reply to  Cyrus Miller
9 years ago

As it applies to rookie draft strategy, playing it safe will never get you the Adrian Petersons, Calvin Johnsons, AJ Greens, and Trent Richardsons of the world. If those kinds of players deliver on the potential that earned them 1.01 status, you will not be able to afford them once they have production on their side. Swinging for the fences has its place. Having a team of depth does not replace having uber studs. If anything, having depth affords you the luxury of swinging for the fences. Obviously, THIS draft is not the one to do that.

Last year, I saw an owner trade Murray, Cruz, and 1.05 (Luck) for 1.01. That kind of deal probably falls under the umbrella of trading the farm. This owner ended up winning it all. After a year of production by Richardson, it is doubtful he could get him for the same haul this year.

sixshooter
9 years ago

Just had a similar discussion with another owner in our dynasty league today. We are in the second round of our draft and looking at the prospects still available with our jaw dropped wondering if we are just buying into the hype of the draft or if there are still legitimate rookies available. I’d like to believe that there are still legitimate players available but which one’s are they? They certainly all are not legitimate….that is the key to second round picks especially!

The other owner had just traded his 2.02 for a first round pick next year to the guy who took Lacy in round 1 so that he could also add Franklin to his roster all but insuring that he has the Green Bay starting RB. Not sure I would ever trade a round 1 pick for a round 2 but never say never I guess.

I used the same philosophy at RB by taking Stepfan Taylor with pick 9 in round 1 which created a stir considering the team he landed on also took what many to believe the #4 back later in the same draft but I was able to land Ellington with the 2.04 pick through a previous trade.

In all…..you can’t worry about what other owner’s think….you just have to go with the guy you feel will benefit your team the most.

For example, Stepfan Taylor was the first guy I wrote down as a possible pick at #9 in round one before last season even ended and as the draft got closer…..I didn’t believe he would still be there but after he was drafted by the Cardinals who also chose to take another back later who was a top ranked back….his stock fell leaving many to believe he was a reach in the first round.

But……I took the guy in a PPR league who most had as the best pass catching RB in the draft. Hopefully he will be the next Jahvid Best whose career will last for 5 or 6 years.

If that is the case…..then I very well could have gotten the steal of this years draft and if he even comes remotely close…..I will still feel that I made the best choice as RB is my biggest need at the same time!

Sean C.
9 years ago

Need some help from my DLF peeps here….

I traded Torrey Smith and the 1.8 pick for the 1.1 & 2.1 pick(10 team league), with every intention of drafting Bernard or Lacy. I’m now having to consider Bell, and Austin (I’m a Rams fan) just cause of their situations/talent.
My gut says Bernard should be my pick, but Austin interests me considering he’ll playing on turf more than 1/2 the year – just adding to his speed and shiftiness. After the Packers drafted Franklin, it made me think they didn’t fully believe in Lacy. You almost have to commit to getting both of them or neither, since they are both extremely talented with 3 down potential. Right now, I rank the top 4 like this:
1. Bernard
2. Austin
3. Bell
4. Lacy

So, what are your thoughts? What would you do?

BigD
Reply to  Sean C.
9 years ago

i wouldnt be concerned about the packers drafting franklin having an effect on lacy. everyone is worried about how the packers view lacy because they drafted franklin. first off, why did they draft lacy anyway if they are worried about him having enough talent? i dont understand this mentallity. they drafted lacy as the 3 down back that they’ve needed for several years now. i live in east wisconsin, and understand the weather in this state. if and when the packers again get home field advantage thoughout the playoffs it will be important to have a rb they can count on to handle 20-30 carries a game if the weather so dictates. rodgers is by some opinions the best qb in the nfl. but even the greatest one cant beat the weather and this time GB wants to be able to have other options to fall back on. franklin is a compliment to the passing game but lacy was drafted specifically to help create a power running option that further opens up the packer offense and gives rodgers more effectiveness in his passing game by keeping the Ds honest knowing the packers can now run the football when and if they want to. only lacy brings that power to the run game. franklin is very much like the other rbs they have on the roster now. they started to have that in benson before he was hurt. now they have it for sure in the best rb rated in the draft.

BigD
Reply to  BigD
9 years ago

all the so called experts are bashing lacy because the packers drafted franklin. bernard and bell are even being takin before him. i think that is a complete mistake. they say that because lacy is in a pass first offense, he wont get as many carries. what you have to look at as far as landing spots you have to look at the total ranking and capabilities of that offense. ranking bell ahead of ball or lacy is a mistake. in my opinion you have to look at the denver and greenbay offenses and you have to say they are respectfully ranked 1-2 in each direction. close your eyes and pick one. why wouldnt you want a rb in either of these offenses with the point that these teams drafted these guys to be their game changers is beyond me? this is just common sense to evaluate these rbs in this manner.

sixshooter
Reply to  BigD
9 years ago

I tend to agree with ranking Bell ahead of Ball or Lacy but I would be hesitant to take Lacy with a top pick. I may even be tempted to take Austin before him and probably Bernard as well.

The so called experts who have been critical of Lacy or not just those commenting in blogs but those who have way more knowledge of the player and his shortcoming whether it’s an injured toe or a bad attitude or a poor work ethic or whatever…..the scouts, GM’s and coaches! So I can totally understand an owner choosing to take Bell ahead of Lacy because those with much more knowledge than I about the player and have actually met the player……did the same!

What happened in our league is that the owner who chose Lacy traded for the second pick in round 2 and took Franklin all but locking up the Green Bay backfield. The type of offense Green Bay runs has little to do with because it is not much different from when Ryan Grant was running wild for the Pack!

BigD
Reply to  sixshooter
9 years ago

well apparently ted thompson thinks highly of lacy. thats good enough for me. and remember the last time the packers were in the super bowl is when they had a great post season from a rb (starks)….when it gets cold and the wind howls in wisconsin, the run game is important….ask peyton manning also. so i understand why Gb drafted lacy and why denver did ball, as well as why pitts did in bell….but the overall effectivness of these offenses are still the best reasons not to undervalue lacy and ball. that is a mistake in my opinion.

German Cowboys
Reply to  Sean C.
9 years ago

No Montee Ball ? huge mistake!!!!

Bernard is just a complement and smallish RB. i know, The Law Firm is who he is, no need to discuss further, but Bernard was not brought in by the Bengals to be the Lead-dog.They want to copy the Saints and Pats by using him on screen passing to use his open field running strength to create mismatches.

Bell with the Steelers is tempting, but the O-Line is so bad, i won’t bet on Bell having much room to run, besides Haley’s ding and dong passing won’t help either.
But i would take Bell over Bernard anytime here.

Lacy, i realy like, but need to see how he recovered from Big Toe fusion surgery, and if the Franklin factor would work in the new offense-style. btw.: the Packers do like DuJuan Harris. They might use Lacy to pound the ball and on goal-line and Harris and Franklin on passing and 3rd Downs. i do not see Lacy being the classic workhorse here.

Montee Ball will run behind the best O-Line in Football. Manning’s-Broncos’s passing-game will open huge holes to run for him and they will put the ball right in so many goal-line situation, so Ball should have as many opportunities to score. Hillman is just a complement back with pass-blocking weaknesses, he is no serious threat to Ball. McGahee will not getting younger, and we will see him take a backseat for good this season. Montee is the whole package. a true 3 Down back. He landed in the best situation of all RB’s.

My sleeper RB, who will surprise would be the Rams rookie Zacky or something. i am not sold on either Pead and D.Richardson, who is a better RB on passing downs.

i agree on Ausitn, he landed in a great situation, he will deliver, but neither Givens nor Quick are not going anywhere and Cook will be a factor too. i think Austin will deliver some WR3 stats not more.

in Longterm, i see Patterson being the Best WR rookie from this class ( career-wise), so he is my Dynasty WR No.1

So my list in respnse to the above one, would be like this:

1) Montee Ball.
2) Bell.
3) Lacy.
4) Austin.
5) Bernard.

German Cowboys
Reply to  German Cowboys
9 years ago

a mistake by me here:

Austin should be 2) behind Ball, then Bell, Lacy and Bernard…i was focusing on RB’s too much in this case.

phildees
9 years ago

yeah picks can be crazy… i traded brady for the number 1 pick and wes welker this year…i got russel wilson as my starter so i made the deal bc i wanted bernard very bad…then he goes to the sorry damn bengals… a timeshare at best.. and then the other 2 rbs i had at top of my list went both to green bay!!?? so now my “sleeper” guy i was hoping to get in the 2nd round is my guy at number 1 and that is prob gonna be leveon bell….he was a beast in college and wentto the place where they actually know how to feature a rb not named peterson….i like ball too and i absolutely hate tavon austin bc he is as big as my right nut! i will gladly miss out on his potential bc i think hopkins should be first wr taken…sucks to have num 1 pick in a sorry ass draft like this but ithink there will be some good fantasy talent in a year or two from this draft but just no top end stuff now!

Reply to  phildees
9 years ago

Thanks for the feedback.
Sorry, I failed to mention I will not be drafting Montee Ball. I just can’t draft a player that gets beat up on the campus he’s supposed to be the king of…
Now I’m stuck back on Lacy or Bernard? This one might be solved scientifically-with a coin flip! Thanks for not knowing the Rams’ RB name! Don’t matter, Pead is gonna blow it up this year! Rams in 2013

sixshooter
Reply to  Sean C.
9 years ago

Pretty sure that Ball isn’t the first football player to get beat up in college but he was jumped by 5 guys. The only reason it made news is because he was a star athlete who ended up in the hospital.

I think much less of the three Alabama players that jumped a guy than I am critical of a guy who ended up in the hospital after being jumped by five guys!

Anyway, I actually like Ball alot and was shocked when the Bronco’s took him ahead of Lacy (which I totally agree with)! Ball went #1 overall in our league by the owner who originally traded me that pick which was his to begin with only to beg for it back and gave up a ton half way through last season! I wasn’t going to give it away because I was eyeing Ball the year before and hoping he would slip to number two where I was picking but he stayed in school. This year I ended up with Stepfan Taylor at #9.

Ram’s RB? Are you thinking of Stacy? I actually believe Richardson is the back to own in St. Louis but it is kind of a mess right now until they sort things out!

To Top
Skip to toolbar