35 Responses to “Making a List: Dynasty League Features”

  1. jubben says:

    First off, I love auction drafts, I think they are a much better system then the serpentine draft. However, I wouldn’t want to use one in a dynasty league because it eliminates trading for picks.

    • Brian says:

      If that’s the concern, how about trading auction dollars like most leagues do with BB dollars?

    • Ryan McDowell says:

      I understand the thought and that was a bit of a roadblock as I set up my leagues. What I settled on was a system where owners can still trade picks in advance. Each pick is worth a certain dollar amount. So the 1.01 is worth much more than the 1.12 and so on. Once the full amounts are known after the season, then owners can trade any amount, even if it does not line up with a certain pick.

      • Jubben says:

        I didn’t think about that, very nice, maybe I’ll try to convince my main league to transfer to a system like this. Great article by the way, I just had that one concern originally.

        • Ryan McDowell says:

          Here’s the setup we use for most of my auction leagues…
          1.01 $320 2.01 $100 3.01 $44
          1.02 $295 2.02 $95 3.02 $41
          1.03 $270 2.03 $90 3.03 $38
          1.04 $245 2.04 $85 3.04 $36
          1.05 $225 2.05 $80 3.05 $34
          1.06 $205 2.06 $75 3.06 $32
          1.07 $185 2.07 $70 3.07 $30
          1.08 $165 2.08 $65 3.08 $28
          1.09 $150 2.09 $60 3.09 $26
          1.10 $135 2.10 $55 3.10 $24
          1.11 $120 2.11 $50 3.11 $22
          1.12 $110 2.12 $47 3.12 $20

          So, before/during the season, I could trade my future 1st, like any league, without knowing what the actual dollar value will be.

          We also “stack” our money, meaning if I have the 1.01, 2.01 and 3.01, I have a total of $464 to spend on my rookies. I could throw all of that at one player, or spread it out for a dozen guys, or anywhere in between.

    • Scott Peak says:

      I agree with Ryan and Brian. There are solutions to this dilemma. I play in Ryan’s Kitchen Sink league, and it has an auction format. It was my first auction league, and I LOVE it. Auctions are the best and fairest way to conduct a dynasty draft, and generate the most excitement. Plus, strategy is intense, not only in selecting players you want, but also players you want to bid up to make other owners spend their dollars. Value is truly determined by all owners with auction, and if you play it right, savvy owners can get great players at a discount, usually later in the draft when other owners run out of cash. Converting picks to dollars is a great way to solve the issue, and in Kitchen Sink, it works very well. I highly encourage dynasty owners to try all of the above, including development players and auction style formats. You won’t regret it.

      Great article Ryan!

      • Terminalkennedy says:

        Terrific article, the kitchen sink format allows many avenues for creativity and prevents breakdowns because of “snipes” in serpentine drafts, or go big vs balanced in traditional auction drafts. It’s a true chess players drama go have teams have options to Go young,old, build depth…

        I think the best part of ks2 is understanding the value of rookies and devy picks in trades; this is a transferable learned skill which was missing from my trade repertoire before I joined.

        Live for this format!!! My only objection is there aren’t enough for me to join :)

        • Ryan McDowell says:

          Thanks guys, for a league like that, it takes dedicated and smart owners. The success of that league is thanks to you two, and the other guys in that group.

    • bonscott says:

      All depends on how you set it up. In my contract league it’s also auction. But we do a regular draft for rookies with slotted salaries like the NFL (so the #1 overall pick will have a higher salary then #10 overall and it varies by position as well).

      So we hold an off-season auction from mid March to mid August for all free agents (including those whose contract have expired, aren’t tagged and thus not kept). In early may we have a standard rookie draft. These picks are traded as much as any dynasty league I’m in and they have the additional wrinkle of the higher the pick the higher the salary so if I’m up against my salary cap I may trade down if anything to get a lower salary to fit the guy on my team. In season it’s blind bidding for free agents with your free cap space being your bidding “cap”.

      • Ryan McDowell says:

        Yeah, I haven’t really figured out a great way to include salaries into the equation with my leagues. Sounds like you all have a good system!

        • bonscott says:

          As for salary, whatever the auction won value is, that’s the salary for the player. What we did for rookies is after the first year draft that 2nd year we had the first separate rookie draft and we took averages of what rookies went for the previous year and came up with a salary scale. A couple years later we adjusted it a bit but it’s now been the same for many years. Email me if you want more details, it’s commished by one of the guys in the HA3 league.

  2. Brian says:

    I really like the Toilet Bowl idea but have a question. Does you actual draft spot continue to he based on regular season record or based on toilet bowl results? For example, if a team finished in last in the regular season but wins the toilet bowl, do they get 1.01 and 1.13 or 1.06 and 1.13?

    • NattyDread says:

      The problem with a dynasty toilet bowl, is that it will likely discourage late season trading between contenders and rebuilders. So one hand it’ll probably lead to greater late season competiveness, but on the other less trading activity.

      • No says:

        We have this in all ours leagues and this couldn’t be further from what happens. No one cares about this, it’s just something to play for so more people in the league have a reason to watch more football. If you are holding onto a guy because you want to win a measly toilet bowl, then you don’t understand dynasty leagues.

        • Ryan McDowell says:

          This is pretty much how I see it too. The owners in my leagues definitely want an additional 1st rounder, but I don’t think that would cause them to hang onto a veteran or a player with short term value if the right deal came along.

      • Scott Peak says:

        It’s a valid point to raise, but in my experience, it hasn’t impacted trading. In fact, I’ve made trades in dynasty leagues that made sense for me, so I could try to get 1.13 in the toilet bowl. 1.13 definitely has value and is worth targeting for teams not in title contention. Any chance to improve a team is worth pursuing, and winning the toilet bowl is another way to do it. Adding 1.13 as a prize for the toilet bowl increases strategy and I think it’s a great idea.

    • Ryan McDowell says:

      Our full draft order is based on a combination of regular season standings and playoff results. The last place team would get the 1.01 and could still win the TB, giving them the 1.13 as well.

    • Slick says:

      in my league we award the #1 overall pick to the winner of toilet bowl (we call it the booty bowl). since we follow 1-12, 13 -24, etc( instead of serpentine) for draft order, this is a huge incentive.

      • No says:

        I would be 100% against this rule. It would barely ever give the worst team and the team that needs the top overall pick the most the chance of having the top overall pick. If you have an issue with people bombing in the end to get to the worst record, than the league has integrity issues that should be addressed.

        • Slick says:

          that actually has not been the case. by the way, we do not do this to counter people bombing at the end. if that is the case, we would boot you out of the league. our goal is league interest and it works. guys stay interested and working on their teams through ff playoffs. also, i should add that if you do not win the booty bowl, then the rest of draft order is determined by reverse order of standings. so the worse you can do is 2nd overall pick, which is not a bad place to be. so it offers something for everyone.

          • Harry says:

            Just curious, how many times has the worst team secured the #1 overall pick?

          • Slick says:

            once out of last 4 years or so. although we recently added a 1st round bye for 2 worst teams (similar to how to handle money bracket) and that seems to help.

  3. MacLeod says:

    In my league we have both a salary cap and contracts. Contracts are given during the free agent auction where all players who are not under contract or NFL rookies can be bid on. All contracts are guaranteed, so if you sign someone to a 4 year contract they are a hit on your salary cap for 4 years even if you drop them. We then have a rookie draft that does not snake for NFL rookies only. Rookie contracts are based on what pick they were. I am really enjoying this mix of auction, salary cap, and rookie draft.

  4. Paul T says:

    Love your list. :) My favorite league uses 3 out of your top 5 list. Player contracts are amazing because it guarantees turnover and requires some real long term planning. Only having a couple of mechanisms available each year to keep your players often makes you think 3,4, even 5 years down the road when building your team, as well as totally changes the value of some players based on if they could be kept long term or if they are destined to enter the open market.

    Couple that with Auctions – which we use to win free agents and franchised tagged players with expiring contracts – makes for an offseason where you just never stop checking into your league.

    I’ve never tried a league with a developmental roster, but it sounds like it could be good times! I really love the rookie draft though, it would be hard to let that go.

    • Ryan McDowell says:

      You still get the rookie draft, there are just a few players already spoken for. In fact, each off-seaosn, you get the rookie and devy draft/auction. So, double the fun!

  5. Lab says:

    I’m sold. This looks truly excellent. If enough others want to copy Ryan’s bylaws and develop a new league along these lines, I’m game. I’m not sure I’m capable of commishing a league like this, but perhaps someone will volunteer or we can develop some system to share the workload. Anyone up for a little adventure?

    Ryan, how big a job is it to commish one of these things? How much does MFL automate?

    • Ryan McDowell says:

      First of all, I would strongly encourage any dedicated dynasty owner to trying a “Kitchen Sink” type league. After less than a year, it is already my favorite league and I am lucky enough to play in some very good leagues, so that says a lot.

      As a commish though, It is a ton of work. If you put a good group of owners together though, it will be worth it.

      Feel free to steal all bylaws and ask any questions as you go.

      • fantasyfootballPro says:

        I guess I’m not completely sure how the start up goes. It seems like everyone is available to be brought up for bid. I seem to be missing something for the initial start up. I get from there.

        • Ryan McDowell says:

          Each owner starts with a set amount (we used $400) and all current players are available to be nominated and bid on. Also, 12 devy picks are available. You can win those and use them in the devy auction which is held later in the off-season. Last year, we included rookies as well. This year, we are holding the startup earlier in the offseason, so we’ll have a separate rookie auction.

  6. lahwee says:

    Been doing the contract dynasty keeper for the last 6 years , my favorite by far , all great ideas

  7. Defender says:

    I love the idea of a Toilet Bowl, but I know it by a different set-up.

    The TB I first saw was one where the you competed for the worst rank (and tried to lose), and the worst teams get the top picks. So to make it fair, you choose your opponent’s line-up and your opponent chooses your line-up. (You could make teams post the line-ups on your forum or pm the commish, but set-up a deadline for line-up submission at 24 hours before kickoff.)

    In my opinion, this makes it competitive, but also ensures that a bad team will get a good pick.

  8. bill williams says:

    Great article!….the best dynasty article that I’ve read in a while.

    I checked out the kitchen sink league and have a couple questions.

    First of all, it looks like the losers of the division championship games actually played in the superbowl. How does this happen? If your victory-point bonus played into it, then it would appear that the league is basically an accumulated-points league.

    Secondly, I am curious about the auction bidding and your strategy. You spent substantially less than the budgeted amount ($314 spent out of a $450 budget)and ended up with fred Jackson as your rb1. Do you save a good part of your budget for free agency?

    Thanks for your response and a terrific article.

    • bill williams says:

      Or did you maybe cut some guys that you had bid on?

    • Ryan McDowell says:

      Thanks Bill! We have a unique playoff system which makes our brackets look very odd. Basically, each matchup is a 2 week head to head game, so what shows up in the bracket isn’t always the reality of the results.

      As for my roster, I spent a lot of my devy picks, which does not show up in the $314 total. Also, I made quite a few trades during the season, dealing away Brady, Tannehill and Julius Thomas. Our startup auction funds and FABB are different pools.

      Thanks for reading!

  9. devildawgz says:

    Like the Toilet Bowl idea. We currently let 8 of our 12 teams in the playoffs. The four teams that didnt make it get put into a lottery for the start of next years draft. Using the TB we can drop to six teams in, six out. Still use the lottery for the bottom four teams initial first round pick and use a 1.13 as incentive. I like the idea of ‘losing’ to win and having your opponent set your roster with the two worst teams getting byes the first week of the FF playoffs.

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